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Full Tilt Tips

Customizing Your Flex | Full Tilt Tips

The Original Three Piece Design

If you didn’t know already, Full Tilt Boots are created with a simplistic 3-piece design. In short, our boots are comprised of three elements:

  1. The Lower Shell
  2. The Upper Cuff
  3. The Tongue
Full Tilt Boots 3-Piece Design
Full Tilt Boots 3-Piece Design

The Tongue

Without the tongue, any Full Tilt Boot can flex freely, without any resistance. This is where your flex comes into play. All Full Tilt tongues feature a ribbed design, making for a more efficient and naturally flexing boot. There is no distortion or bottoming out, along with no shin bang.

Full Tilt Tongues
Customize Your Flex

Perhaps the greatest thing about this 3-piece design is how you can change the tongue, or change the flex. Depending on your skiing abilities, you can put on a softer tongue for more flexibility, or a stiffer tongue for a more aggressive skiing style. You can even change your flex based on the current skiing conditions.

Change Your Flex

Changing your flex is easy and can be done in seconds. Simply unbuckle the boot and open the tongue up all the way. You will see a little hinge holding the tongue in place, simply pry this hinge open and slide the tongue out of boot. Grab your new tongue and insert it into the boot in the same fashion.

Skip to 1:25 to get a tutorial on changing your tongue 

Want more flex options for your boot? You can customize your tongues here.

Full Tilt Tips

How Your Full Tilt Boots Should Fit | Full Tilt Tips

Ski boots are quite possibly the most complex, high tech piece of footwear that you’ll ever own. They perform a vital job day in and day out on the mountain. From connecting you to your skis, to keeping your feet warm and dry, to allowing you to rip groomers, moguls, park, and pow, your boots are a very important piece of equipment. That’s why it is imperative your boots fit properly.

Full Tilt Boots

Comfort Is Performance

It’s no secret that Full Tilt Boots are known for their comfort. They are the easiest boots to get in and out of on the market. But, there are more factors than comfort to take note of when trying on your boots.

  1. Your boots should feel extremely snug when you first try them on. In fact, you should feel your toes touching the end of the boot. This may seem counterintuitive, but the more snug your boot feels, the more control you will have on your skis. Not to mention, when you are leaning forward in your ski stance, you toes will slide back from the front of the boot, relieving that pressure feeling.
  2. Take note of the width of the boots. Ski boots come in different lasts (widths) to account for the different foot shapes of skiers. Do you know if you have a wide or narrow foot? In the case of Full Tilt you can get a boot with a 102mm last or a 99mm last. If you don’t know whether your foot is classified as wide or narrow we recommend trying on one boot for each last and determining which feels better.
  3. You don’t want to be ‘swimming’ in your boots.  This is a slight re-iteration on the first point, but that’s how important it is to ensure your ski boots are not too big. If you can feel empty space in your boots, then they are too big. They may feel comfortable when you first try them on, but that will change once you start skiing. When you have room to move in your boots, you will have less control of your skis, and your feet will slide around thus causing you more pain than if you had a snug, secure fit.
  4. Perform a shell fit. Remove the liner from the shell of the boot. Step into the shell and slide your foot all the way forward until your toes are touching the end of the shell. Now test how much space you have between the shell and your heel. For this, you can use the finger test. If you have more than 2 fingers worth of space between your heel and the shell, the boot is too big. If you have a 1-2 fingers width of space between the shell and your heel then the boot is a good size. Now perform the same test on the side of the boot, on both sides of your ankle to determine if the width is right for you.
  5. Ensure you are in the right flex. Finally, you want to determine if you are in the right flex for your style of skiing. If you are a casual skier, you may want a softer flex. If you are an expert, hard charging skier, a stiffer flex is for you. Ensure you have the flexibility you need in the boot, and remember you can always purchase aftermarket tongues for your Full Tilt Boots. 

There are a lot of factors that come into play when finding the right ski boot. It is also important to note that over time, your boot’s liner will wear down thus giving the boot a slightly bigger feel. Just another reason to ensure you are getting a boot that is snug and secure on your foot, and not too big.

So check out all of the Full Tilt Boots that we have to offer, and don’t forget to go to your local boot-fitter to ensure you are getting the best-fitting boot you can.

 

Full Tilt Tips

Preventing Shin Bang | Full Tilt Tips

Shin Bang. The dreaded pain that all skiers fear. Whether you’re new to skiing, or you’ve been doing it for years, sooner or later, you’ll experience the feeling of shin bang. Many people tend to think it occurs from one’s shin simply ‘banging’ against the front of the boot, but there’s actually a lot more to it than that.

Causes of Shin Bang

It all comes down to the size and fit of your boot, and your typical skiing style.

  1. Let’s start with the obvious. Your ski boot is too big. If you have too much room to breathe in your boot, then it’s pretty obvious that your foot and shin will be moving around while skiing. Instead of having a ‘roomy’ feel, you want your ski boot to be as snug as possible. Many professional skiers will actually size down from their typical shoe size in a ski boot in order to increase control and limit the possibility of shin bang. Not saying you have to be like a professional skier, but a tight boot is the way to go.
  2. You’re skiing and/or landing backseat. This is where the mis-conception that shin bang relates to purely from ‘banging your shin’ stems from. Rather, when you consistently ski or land in the back-seat position, you are actually causing a great deal of stress on your shins. Instead of banging and bruising them, you are tearing little tissues and muscles within your shin, similar to that of shin splints.
  3. Your boot is the wrong flex. Flex, of course, relates to how stiff your boots is. In the case of Full Tilt, flex numbers can range from 4-12, with 4 being soft and 12 being stiff. While with many other companies you may see flex’s ranging from 80-130. In simple terms, if you are relatively small and lightweight, you should not be in a stiff boot as this will cause less mobility and therefore strain your shin. However, if you are a heavier, aggressive skier, you shouldn’t be in a soft boot, as too much maneuverability will onset shin bang as well. In order to find your perfect flex we suggest talking to your local skip shop and getting properly boot-fitted.
  4. Your liner is worn out. Overtime, your boot’s liner will become ‘packed out.’ In other words, the comfy foam that your liner once had, will dissipate overtime and there make the boot more spacious and less padded.

Preventing Shin Bang

Shin bang can make or break a day on the hill. Don’t let it stop you from getting after it. Make sure you have a boot that fits properly. Nice and snug, not loose like your shoes might be. Make sure you’re skiing in the proper stance, and if you can’t stop landing backseat then work on strengthening your legs. The stronger your legs are, the less likely you are to land backseat!

Full Tilt Boots Liner

Finally, ensure you are in the proper flex for your height, weight, and skiing ability, and get new boots and/ or liners every few years to avoid old, packed out gear. With Full Tilt, you can always customize your boots with new tongues and new linersMake sure you always have the proper gear, simple as that. 

 

Full Tilt Tips

Taking Care Of Your Full Tilt Boots | Full Tilt Tips

The lifts have stopped spinning. The snow has melted. The ski season has officially ended. We know, it’s pretty sad. But, just because the ski season is over doesn’t mean you should neglect on properly taking care of your gear during the off-season. Check out these few tips to ensure you are extending the longevity of your Full Tilt Boots.

Full Tilt Boots

Wash Your Shells and Liners

For the sake of your mom, dog, and everyone else in your house, you should definitely be washing your shells and liners after every ski season. Using warm water, anti-bacterial soap, and a soft cloth, wipe down the inside and outside of your shells.

With your liners, give them a good rinse with a mixture of hot water and anti-bacterial soap. After rinsing, wipe them with a soft cloth just like you did with the shells. We strongly recommend NOT throwing them in a washing machine- the last thing you want is your liners to rip!

After washing, set out both the shells and liners to air dry- no rush right? You’ve got all summer… Avoid throwing your liners in the dryer as you don’t want the hot temperatures to mess with the mold.

Full Tilt Boots Liner

Check Your Buckles and Heels

Are your buckles and heels in good shape after a year of wear and tear? If you spent a lot of your winter walking to and from a parking lot, chances are your heels are pretty beat up. It’s not a bad idea to replace your heels each year to ensure proper safety and bindings release mechanics.

Tom Wallisch Full Tilt Boots

Buckle Em’ Up

You want to keep your boots contracted so that the liners stay form fitting and don’t loosen too much over the summer. So buckle them up, store them in a comfortable, room temperature setting, and continue counting down the days until the chair lifts start spinning again.

Full Tilt Ascendant

Full Tilt Boots 2020 Preview

Check out the boots in store for the 2020 season

It can be a sad time of year for us skiers. Temperatures are warming up, the snow is melting, and some chairlifts have stopped spinning.  But it’s no time to be sad, instead get stoked for next winter by checking out the new boots Full Tilt has in store for the 2020 ski season.

We’re coming out with new boots, revamped boots, new graphic designs, and even the addition of Aprés Booties. But in the meantime, check out some our our new offerings below!

 

Full Tilt 2020 Ascendant

Full Tilt Ascendant

The raved about Full Tilt Ascendant is back and remains unchanged for the 2020 season with the exception of a fresh new paint job. With tech inserts, a removable tongue that opens up a massive range of motion, and the tried-and-true Full Tilt fit and performance you deserve, The Ascendant doesn’t compromise.

Full Tilt 2020 Descendant 8

Full Tilt Descendant 8

The Full Tilt Descendant 8 is a prime example of comfort meeting performance. A 102mm last, 8 flex tongue, gripwalk outsoles, a walk mode, and a 100% intuition wrap liner. Charge hard on and off of the mountain with the Descendant 8.

Full Tilt 2020 Drop Kick Pro

Full Tilt Drop Kick Pro

With a fully customizable Pro Liner, and the engaging, precise Full Tilt Original Shell, the Full Tilt Drop Kick is the boot of choice for Olympic freestyle skiers. With a reliable 6 flex tongue decked out in Oxblood Red you’re sure to turn some heads in these.

Before you know it these boots will be hitting the shelves at your local Full Tilt Dealer. So don’t be sad that the ski season is coming to a close. Be stoked that you can grab a pair of new Full Tilts and get after it next season!

And don’t forget to follow along on Instagram as we continue to post new boot previews. 

 

Maude Raymond’s Focus on Style

Flowing in style from the car park to the terrain park // photo: Rachel Bock

“It’s all about flow and doing what feels good.” – Maude Raymond

Montreal, Canada born Maude Raymond grew up surrounded by a culture of outdoor sports and smooth style. Gymnastics, diving and ski racing were building blocks to her love of freeskiing and an integral foundation to fluidity, flow, and style.

Starting her career competing on the world circuit, Maude stepped away from the start house and focused on traveling and filming to showcase her own style and aesthetic. Inspiring women around the world ever since,  as an extension of her smooth skiing style, she has formed her own brand, MAAD.

From the products, imagery, and film Maude produces the Soul Sister’s style and function are a perfect extension of herself.


“The Soul Sisters are so comfortable and easy to put on! They help me ski smoothly and the height is perfect to keep my knees at their full strength.”



Maude Raymond in Japan.

 

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Wanna talk true Love ? So happy to be in @whistlerblackcomb again. P: @maxmorello

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Head in the clouds ☾ ✦ P: @bengirardi

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Lena Stoffel Chases the Winterfox

Freeride Full Tilt athlete Lena Stoffel, based in Innsbruck, Austria took a journey in the frozen lands of Hokkaido, Japan with her warm Soul Sister boots for a start to the season that was too good not to share with the world. Enjoy the teaser

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Watch out! This is a picture which I took on my travels through Hokkaido! The northern fox! My new movie which will be released this fall is called „WINTERFOX“ and it’s the first movie I produced completely myself! I filmed most of it myself, except the skiing of me is filmed by someone else! I edited myself and the music I worked with musicians who made the tracks especially for my movie! Thanks to @roryjwilliams and @lacurren ! And thanks to @charlesmeny for helping me with the finishing touches! Soon I will release a teaser with dates of screenings! So watch out for „WINTERFOX“ ! #ajourneythroughwinter #skiing #snowsurfing #skitouring #powder #japan #makewavesmovemountains @roxy @ortovox @lumix #lumixstories #hes12060 #sponsored #lumixg9

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“I spent two months in Japan last winter and wanted to show everybody what Hokkaido means to me, through my eyes. I feel so content and calm in that country. It feels like a second home to me. But this was a big challenge as I am new in the field of filming.”– Lena Stoffel

Winterfox, the first part of her new series “a journey through winter”, offers an immersive perspective of the Japanese island, seen through her eyes – a delicate balance between the raw power of skiing and the poetic beauty of Hokkaido’s wildlife and landscapes.

The short movie was shot and directed by Lena Stoffel herself alongside crew members Aaron Jamieson, Simon Abt, and Bine Zalohar. With a very special soundtrack of Rory J Williams & Lee Ann Curren, this short film is a unique experience.

Full Tilt 2019 Preview

Get a Sneak Peak at the 2019 Boots Before They Hit Shelves

Outside of a few select locales, the lifts have shut down. As skiers, it’s the most dreaded time. Shoulder Season. Mud Season. Spring. Whatever you call it, there’s that awkward time when it’s too late to ski — but too early to do much besides bemoan the end of yet another year sliding on snow.

But don’t fret; there are still ways to keep the stoke alive. Whether you’re waiting for an upcoming summer shred trip, or just counting down the days until the local spot reopens next winter, pouring over the newest gear is a surefire way to get you psyched.

And we’re here to help. You’ve probably seen the all-new Full Tilt Ascendant floating around the internet. We’ve been putting in the time to ensure that FulL Tilt’s first foray into backcountry boots stands up and accommodates all of your needs. We think we crushed it. But that’s not all we’ve been working on this year. Read on to see what’s new in the world of Full Tilt months before the newest boots hit the shop floor.


First Chair Series

 

The hard-charging boot is back yet again, offered in three different builds: The First Chair 6, 8, and 10. Pick your flex and feature set, and boom: you’re ready to send. This year, we’ve upped the quality with a matte finish and textured rand. Aside from smooth styling and a rich finish, this leads towards a longer lasting, scuff-resistant life year after year, lap after lap. Did we mention it looks really good?

Dropkick

 

You might have seen these in the Olympics. No? Well, maybe you weren’t looking close enough. Because Full Tilt Athletes represented strong in the PyeonChang Games; taking home podium finishes in just about every single freestyle event at the Korean Games. And to celebrate those talented athletes, we took the definitive freestyle boot and created a colorway that pays homage to those ripping skiers. So whether you’re boosting the pipe or blasting bump runs, you can feel — and look — exactly like your favorite Olympic skier. And you can snag your favorite colorway at awesome retailers — local and abroad now.

Descendant Series

 

But what if your foot trends larger? Maybe you’re done cramming into plug boots and need a bit more room to breathe. That was why over three years ago, we introduced the FTE shell. The Descendant Collection continues to offer the comfort and performance you need to rip hard without losing toenails. And if you look closely at the Descendant 8, you’ll see we’ve integrated the Tour Cuff from the Ascendant. So you can get a more natural stride whenever you’re not clicked into your skis.

So there’s only one thing left to do; find a Full Tilt Boot that works for ya, and get ready. But be sure to visit your local shop – wherever that may be. The fit process is fully customizable, and most shops offer comprehensive fit assessments and molding so your boots can be personalized to fit your exact needs.

From The Field: Adventures to Tagert Hut

Whiteford Tagert

Andrew Whiteford Heads to Colorado’s Tagert Hut

Strewn across Colorado’s hardscrabble high country, there is a series of huts known as the 10th Mountain Division Huts. Originally used for training exercises for the elite Military Unit, these huts are now utilized more for backcountry recreation than anything else. The Tagert Hut, tucked away in the Elk Mountains between Crested Butte and Aspen is one such place. Tagert offers comfy accommodations and — perhaps most importantly — rad ski touring.

Tagert Whiteford

It seems like an only fitting place to put the all-new Full Tilt Ascendant through the paces. So Andrew Whiteford packed up his Volkswagen Eurovan and pointed ‘er south from Jackson. Whiteford linked up with Jake Strassman and his mustached crew of midwest transplants for a long week of sun and ski touring.

From long alpine lines, to quicker treed shots, the mixed terrain offers unbeatable testing environs. Following the group of hearty Minnesotans, Andrew and Jake took to the terrain quickly.

It’s a different pace once the ski area closes; gone are the mornings hustling. Mornings slow roast and give way to late afternoon corn harvests. Towards the end of the day, everyone reconvenes to revel in the day’s accomplishments. It’s a simpler way of life — a regression to once was.

Finally, with this all-new boot, Full Tilt Believers can tap into these vibes, and experience the mountains in new avenues. We’ve gone full tech over here at Full Tilt, and we can’t wait to see how much farther you can go with the Ascendant. Learn more about the newest boots, and go ask your local dealer if they’ve ordered a few pairs.

Simone Canal vs Steve Stepp

Full Tilt Battle in SLVSH Grand Valira

Check out Full Tilt Skiers Simone Canal and OG Steve Stepp put it down in Andorra for the opening round of the SLVSH Cup Grand Valira. Who do you think will walk away with the W? Steve’s consistent, smooth vibe or Simone’s all-out assault? Check it out!

Both Simone and Steve rock the B&E Pro Model Boot. Learn more about it HERE!